travel Archives - West Wind Hardwood
Great to be Involved

Great to be Involved

If you’ve been in business long enough, not only does the hair change colour but you find you’ve been involved in many interesting projects.  Two noteworthy products are recreationally related, and oddly both date back 20 to 30 years ago.  

We’ll start with the preservation of the 1927 Rocky Mountain excursion boat, International. She may be the oldest continuously operating wooden passenger vessel in North America; certainly, she is the oldest operating passenger vessel in Canada, and owned and operated by the Canadian Kretz/Robinson Family.

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The Origins of “Dulwen”

The Classic Wooden Power Boat That Launched in 1957

dulwen parks canada portland island

Well……what to my wondering eyes did we see…?

Jan and I spent a weekend anchored at Royal Cove – Portland Island and spotted some new Parks signage.  It was an “OMG” moment.  That’s our boat!

The photo of the boat is our boat minus a few visual alterations.  The aft steering station has been enclosed, the swim grid lengthened, and stainless guard rails installed.  We’ve turned a gas-engine runabout into a cozy year-round diesel-engine vessel.  As the fifth owner since 1957, we’ve enjoyed her for 20 years; many interior alterations have been made for comfort and safety. We’ve journeyed as far afield as The Broughton Archipelago several times.

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Earth Day Fake News by Shelley

Earth Day Fake News by Shelley

Making The Most of Easter Weekend

Great Way to Celebrate Earth Day!

FAKE NEWS BY SHELLEY | FACT-CHECKING THE FACT-CHECKERS

Remember April is Fool’s Month, and we mustn’t take ourselves too seriously.  As well, Earth Day is intended to bring attention to the importance of protecting our environment, treating Earth respectfully and demonstrating the courage of our convictions.

I hope this brings a chuckle to your day.  And I would love to hear back from our readers.  Tell us if your fact-checkers recognize the truth of these photos. 

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The Age of Wood

The Age of Wood

Our Most Useful Material And the Construction of Civilization

An Essay on the book By Roland Ennos

Roland Ennos is a visiting professor of biological sciences at the University of Hull, England. With his broad scientific knowledge and ability to make connections across disciplines, he is devoted to explaining how the world works for a general audience. He is the author of successful textbooks on plants, biomechanics, and statistics, and his popular book Trees, published by the Natural History Museum, is now in its second edition. Among other things, he is an expert on the mechanics of wood and trees.

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Coastal Nostalgia – Princess Louisa Inlet, BC

Then 1916) and Now (2021)

Jan and I have boated twice to Princess Louisa Marine Park, and the surrounding scenery has not changed in over 100 years.  Remotely beautiful, one is surrounded by 40+ waterfalls.

The famous Malibu Lodge/Club – overlooking Malibu Rapids at the entrance to Princess Louisa Inlet and Marine Park – opened in July 1941, but its operations were suspended until the end of World War II in 1945. From that point until 1950, the facility was open as a premium resort. Visitors included John Wayne, Senator John F. Kennedy, Barbara Stanwyck, Bing Crosby, and Bob Hope.

Photos by Shelley Nielsen – June 2021

Forests at Work

Forests at Work

Forestry isn’t just important for our economy: it helps us enjoy our beautiful outdoors.  The recreation and backcountry road access made possible by forestry is important to both tourism and local communities – especially during our COVID travel bans.

BC has vast conservation areas and the most protected parks in the country (approximately 12% of BC’s total land area), second only to Canada’s national parks system. Many other larger portions are set aside for urban areas and cultural interests, wildlife, big trees, and habitat protections (included within the working forest).  Reconciliation, ecological conservation, and future increases as forests age over time all would suggest that BC will never “lose” its old forests.

Like the many other benefits of a working forest, cultural qualities like non-consumptive recreation — bird watching, hiking, biking, nature photography and more — help promote balance in nature.  Every day, millions of people take advantage of opportunities for outdoor recreation on both public and private land.  Designated protected areas of public land allow access for recreation, helping to improve human welfare while conserving natural resources.

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