PNW Archives - West Wind Hardwood
Forests at Work

Forests at Work

Forestry isn’t just important for our economy: it helps us enjoy our beautiful outdoors.  The recreation and backcountry road access made possible by forestry is important to both tourism and local communities – especially during our COVID travel bans.

BC has vast conservation areas and the most protected parks in the country (approximately 12% of BC’s total land area), second only to Canada’s national parks system. Many other larger portions are set aside for urban areas and cultural interests, wildlife, big trees, and habitat protections (included within the working forest).  Reconciliation, ecological conservation, and future increases as forests age over time all would suggest that BC will never “lose” its old forests.

Like the many other benefits of a working forest, cultural qualities like non-consumptive recreation — bird watching, hiking, biking, nature photography and more — help promote balance in nature.  Every day, millions of people take advantage of opportunities for outdoor recreation on both public and private land.  Designated protected areas of public land allow access for recreation, helping to improve human welfare while conserving natural resources.

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Smarter Is Better In The Woods

Smarter Is Better In The Woods

PLAYING IN A WORKING FOREST

CAMP ~~ PROSPER ~~ THRIVE

Cowichan, derived from the Coast Salish word ‘Khowutzun’ meaning ‘land warmed by the sun’, is an area rich in First Nations history. The Cowichan Valley has been home to First Nations people from the earliest times. Cowichan is the collective name for a number of villages on eastern Vancouver Island. Today, the Cowichan Tribes make up the largest band in British Columbia and members of the band still own and reside on much of the land surrounding Duncan and along the Cowichan River. If outdoor recreation is what you’re after, the Cowichan Lake and River area on southern Vancouver Island is the place to go. Well-known for its outdoor recreation:  swimming, canoeing, white-water kayaking, tubing, camping, fishing or hiking, or just want to take it easy in the sun You’re bound to find something to do in this “recreation corridor” southwest of Duncan.

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