lumber industry Archives | West Wind Hardwood
Rail Trails, Tall Trees and Cougars

Rail Trails, Tall Trees and Cougars

Once upon a time, in a land far away in wilds of British Columbia dwelt the fortunate. Forests thrived; trees reached to the sky and animals were abundant.  It was a land rich, rich in natural resources; one of which was logging; not new news.

The sound of axe and handsaw, of trees falling, of whistles blowing were heard throughout the province, up and down the coast and on Vancouver Island.  Throughout Desolation Sound, Sechelt Inlet and the Broughton Archipelago Jan and I have seen the imprint of times gone by.

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Your Next Unique Project? Potential Product Available to West Wind

Your Next Unique Project? Potential Product Available to West Wind

The pictures show some products potentially available to West Wind, usually something we would not likely stock……. but would bring in if there’s enough interest.

Prices on request along with time frame to bring in.

Ekki Log Slices

4ft high by 4ft in diameter. Butcher blocks for restaurants, or tables, you would not need bases!

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Australia: My Country

Australia: My Country

“I love a sunburnt country,

A land of sweeping plains,

Of ragged mountain ranges,

Of droughts and flooding plains”


by Dorothea Mackellar Originally titled “Core of my Heart”

 

Australia may not be ‘my’ country but my youngest daughter lives there, and her heart is in Australia.  Nor was Australia on my ‘bucket list’ prior to her relocation but having just spent 4-weeks enjoying Western Australia, I know I’ve left something behind and I’ll be back, no question!

Jan read Bill Bryson’s book “In a Sunburned Country”; I’ve just finished it.  It’s apparent we are in awe of this country.  So little is known; so much yet to explore; so many wondrous things to experience.  Absolutely loved the dry heat!  Let me say unequivocally, “moss doesn’t grow there” and I’m a Vancouver girl – born and bred.

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The LO(n)G of the Law

The LO(n)G of the Law

This past April, we had unexpected visit from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.  Three Natural Resource Officers (NROs) – in full uniform – drove into our parking lot.  Turns out they were looking for agents of logs.  How did they figure we dealt with logs?  Well, we’re listed in the Victoria Yellow Pages under ‘Millwork’.  True story!!  They thought we were a mill.

Nevertheless, this prompted us to ask questions and this is what we discovered.  Compliance & Enforcement (C&E) is the law enforcement arm of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.  Its main purpose is to make sure that a variety of resource management laws are being followed on and in BC’s public lands, water and forests and to take action where there is non-compliance.  They also have been designated as Special Conservation Officers, Land Officers, BC Parks Rangers and Fisheries Inspectors with the authority to enforce the associated legislation.

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West Wind Factory Tour: Lunch and Learn

luncheon with BC Architects

April 30, 2015 – Exploring BC’s Millwork Industry: Beyond the Basics

Seminars, Demo’s and Factory Tour for the Vancouver Island Chapter of Architects

Partnered with Roy Manion, Manager, Specifiers Program of the BC Wood Specialties Group
Hosted by West Wind Hardwood Inc
Driven by Joel Radford and Shelley Nielsen
Attended by 25 Architects and Designers from Southern Vancouver Island

This was both a challenge and a hoot for us. We’d never considered offering an on-site learning opportunity until Roy approached us. He nurtured us; coddled us; encouraged us. And it was a success, as born witness by this excerpt from the Vancouver Island Chapter of Architects’ Newsletter………

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Taking the “Lesser” out of Our Lesser-Known Species (LKS)

Photo by Jan T. Nielsen – Jalisco (2005)

 Photo by Jan T. Nielsen – Jalisco (2005)

Let’s agree that the term lesser-known species (LKS) describes species whose regional forest potential is greater than its current use.  As a renewable natural resource, tropical forests are unique.  The problem is in the utilization of such a varied and variable mixture of wood species.

Generally the domestic market is less discriminating than the export market and over time a scale of preference develops and the average consumer is generally unaware that thousands of useful wood species exist. Some species are in high demand, while others are merely acceptable. At the other end of the spectrum, however, is a large number of species broadly and variously called “lesser-known species”, “secondary species”, “unpopular species” and “weed species”.

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