forestry Archives - West Wind Hardwood
Forests at Work

Forests at Work

Forestry isn’t just important for our economy: it helps us enjoy our beautiful outdoors.  The recreation and backcountry road access made possible by forestry is important to both tourism and local communities – especially during our COVID travel bans.

BC has vast conservation areas and the most protected parks in the country (approximately 12% of BC’s total land area), second only to Canada’s national parks system. Many other larger portions are set aside for urban areas and cultural interests, wildlife, big trees, and habitat protections (included within the working forest).  Reconciliation, ecological conservation, and future increases as forests age over time all would suggest that BC will never “lose” its old forests.

Like the many other benefits of a working forest, cultural qualities like non-consumptive recreation — bird watching, hiking, biking, nature photography and more — help promote balance in nature.  Every day, millions of people take advantage of opportunities for outdoor recreation on both public and private land.  Designated protected areas of public land allow access for recreation, helping to improve human welfare while conserving natural resources.

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Why Cut Down a Tree?

Why Cut Down a Tree?

The article below my intro is re-published with Bill Cook’s Blessing, however, it was first published on October 21, 2016 – Michigan State University Extension.

In my mind, Bill’s managed forests are akin to our woodlots. In British Columbia, the term woodlot typically refers to a plot of privately owned forest land. In BC, there are an estimated 20,000+ woodlot owners in the province which have forest holdings greater than 20 hectares (50 acres); an approx. 855 active woodlots.

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The LO(n)G of the Law

The LO(n)G of the Law

This past April, we had unexpected visit from the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.  Three Natural Resource Officers (NROs) – in full uniform – drove into our parking lot.  Turns out they were looking for agents of logs.  How did they figure we dealt with logs?  Well, we’re listed in the Victoria Yellow Pages under ‘Millwork’.  True story!!  They thought we were a mill.

Nevertheless, this prompted us to ask questions and this is what we discovered.  Compliance & Enforcement (C&E) is the law enforcement arm of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.  Its main purpose is to make sure that a variety of resource management laws are being followed on and in BC’s public lands, water and forests and to take action where there is non-compliance.  They also have been designated as Special Conservation Officers, Land Officers, BC Parks Rangers and Fisheries Inspectors with the authority to enforce the associated legislation.

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The Wood Market – Today….Tomorrow – For You and For Me

4-woodmarketwebAbout a month ago, we received an email from a supplier commenting on the strengthening US dollar and it’s affects on the increasing cost of lumber.  This is an upward trend that is a double-edged sword for Canada; a country reliant on exports and a robust trading partner with the US.

“The Hardwood Review Weekly has had two recent articles that offer an explanation as to why lumber has been in tight supply and prices have been on an increase.  Here is a condensed version covering their basic content:

“Overproduction No Longer Inevitable – Several Reasons Why Supply Won’t Overtake Demand Anytime Soon” by Andy Johnson, Editor

Source:  Hardwood Review Weekly, November 29, 2013 (Vol. 30, Issue 11)
Source:  Hardwood Review Weekly, December 6, 2013 (Vol. 30, Issue 12)

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