boats Archives - West Wind Hardwood
A Little Claim to Local Fame

A Little Claim to Local Fame

Jeanne Socrates was 76 when she set sail alone from Victoria, British Columbia, in October 2018, on her 38’ yacht Nereida. She returned to Victoria 339 days later, then 77, having sailed singlehanded non-stop around the world, becoming the oldest sailor to do so. On a previous circumnavigation, she also set a record as the only woman to have circumnavigated solo nonstop from North America.

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Coastal Nostalgia 1939

Advertisement Page as Seen In Pacific Motor Boat – October 1939 – Sold for 25¢

Edwin Monk, Sr. was a prolific Pacific Northwest shipwright and naval architect. He was active from 1914 to 1973 designing pleasure and commercial vessels, both power, and sail. Our 35’ Dulwen was designed by Ed for DULcie and OWEN Fowler of Victoria, BC; philanthropist, inventor and 2nd Commodore of Capital City Yacht Club. She was built by Philbrook’s Boatyard (before they moved to Sidney, BC) in 1957. Ed visited the boatyard to ensure this customized design was flowing well, however, the cost overrun of about $1200 made quite the stir at that time.

Ed was 24 years senior to William (Bill) Garden, who was also a world-renown Pacific Northwest naval architect and marine engineer. We’ve talked about various aspects of Bill’s life in our newsletter over the years. Check it out! Bill’s older brother, Lorne Garden partnered with Ed Monk from the late ’40s into the ’50s. Bet Oliver’s book, ‘Ed Monk and the Tradition of Classic Boats’ mentions that Lorne’s signature is on a lot of their file drawings. It is said, “He was a very good stylist, just like his brother, Bill. In “Yacht Designs (1977), Bill mentions that his much-admired perspective drawings were done using a method “developed with my brother Lorne and based on a Royal Air Force method of making identification drawings of an unknown aircraft from an inflight photo.”

Coastal Nostalgia – #1

Our Inaugural Editorial

Pacific Motor Boat Magazine – Boats of Wood: Men of Steel

Excerpt from Vol. 7 – No. 2 November 1914
I found this ad of interest for two reasons.  First, the cost of accommodation in the wilds of BC; and secondly, the segment of the population they were marketing to.  In 1960, Easterners still considered BC to be wild, woolly and full of trees.  When the Nielsen Family applied to immigrate to Canada, they were seriously told by Government Bureaucrats to avoid BC as all it had to offer were forests and loggers.

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Near and Far: The Little Boat That Won’t

Near and Far: The Little Boat That Won’t

It won’t cost you a lot of money and it won’t keep you in port when the weathers rough.

I don’t doubt for a minute that the Coaster 23 represents the shape of things come for many boaters. A semi-displacement design with small diesel and excellent small boat cruising range, the Coaster is a John Lovett and Dick Chudley creation.  All in all, it’s a boat with the sort of sea-keeping qualities that made this workboat design a success in the first place.

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Five Ships, 1000 Years of History

Five Ships, 1000 Years of History

“To provide a gathering place where maritime history comes alive through direct experience and our small craft heritage is enjoyed, preserved, and passed along to future generations”

 
So reads the Mission Statement of The Center for Wooden Boats in Seattle. What a unique idea — or is it? Sharing maritime culture and skills while preserving the history of a local culture is such a great idea that others seem to have had a similar vision.

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