Australia Archives - West Wind Hardwood

New Australian Woods are in!

Banksia Nuts
always unique looking woods from down under!

Assorted Australian Species

These woods are so unique and variable they are difficult to catalogue. We are happy to supply photos of specific items upon request. Costs will be available soon.

ASSTD KNIFE BLANKS
ASSTD PEN BLANKS
ASSORTED BLOCKS
ASSORTED TURNING DISCS
BROWN GOLDFIELD BURLS
RED GOLDFIELD BURLS
GIMLET BOARDS
SMALL GIMLET BOARDS
GREEN STONE MALLEE BOARDS
GRASS TREE STUMPS
LARGE FAT BANKSIA NUTS
SELECT MEDIUM BANKSIA NUTS
MEDIUM BANKSIA NUTS

Australian Wood Knife & Pen Blanks

https://www.instagram.com/p/CGFoyhwjDSo/

Banksia Nuts

https://www.instagram.com/p/CGFrRPGjgIt/

Australian Wood Burls

https://www.instagram.com/p/CGVJg7lDX4P/

Australian Woods Coming August/September

We have been anticipating another order of Australian wood for some time. Finally, we have our order placed and it will be arriving in 2-3 months.

DescriptionTotal OrderedPrice Per
ASSTD KNIFE BLANKS100 PIECES$30
ASSTD PEN BLANKS100 PIECES$9
ASSORTED BLOCKS41 PIECES$42
ASSORTED TURNING DISCS14 PIECES$50
BROWN GOLDFIELD BURLS121.2 KGS$17 /kg
RED GOLDFEILDS BURL174.1 KGS$17 /kg
GIMLET BOARDS2 PIECES$120.00 (SM) $150.00 (LG)
SMALL GIMLET BOARDS2 PIECES$50
GREEN STONE MALLEE BOARDS2 PIECES$140.00 (SM) $160.00 (LG)
GRASS TREE STUMPS15 PIECES$30
LARGE FAT BANKSIA NUTS174.1 KGS$40 /lb
SELECT MEDIUM BANKSIA NUTS145 KGS$35 /lb
MEDIUM BANKSIA NUTS110 KGS$27 /lb

Photos and more information will be available as it comes to us. We welcome you to pre-order as early as possible, as we suspect the limited stock will go fast! Contact us to do so.

Genus Banksia

Genus Banksia

As promised in Newsletter #80 – February 2019, the hankering to revisit all-things Australian has hit.  I mentioned I had bought the most fabulously illustrated book entitled Firewood Banksia by Philippa Nikulinsky; published by Freemantle Press.  I encourage you to visit Philippa’s website. She shares her thoughts, works, publications; decades of her passions. 

I reached out to Philippa and spoke with Angela Nikulinsky.  Philippa was on holiday but Angela was excited when I proposed using some of Philippa’s artwork from her book.  Drop-in for a visit to Studio N –  and learn about Angela.

The Art of the Banksia

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It’s All about Australia

It’s All about Australia

Specifically Woods Of The Southwest

Is it obvious we have an affinity with all-things Australian?  Admittedly, Australia was never on my bucket list until our youngest daughter moved there in 2013.  Now, with our daughter settling Downunder as a high-school science teacher, wife and mother, our ties have strengthened.  Recently we made our second trip to visit our lovely new grand-daughter, Freja Isabella Tellerup Beeton.

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The Gloucester Tree of Australia

The Gloucester Tree of Australia

One of Three Lookout Trees in Western Australia

All Photos by Shelley Nielsen unless otherwise noted – January 2016
An expansion on Newsletter #63 – April 2016

The Gloucester, Diamond and Dave Evans Bicentennial Trees form a triangle around Pemberton; used as fire lookout trees for decades.  These are no humdrum backyard sun-blockers. Giants in a world of giants, they tower above the surrounding forest; affording spectacular views over the surrounding karri forest and farmland.  It’s a horizon of treetops and on a clear day, it is possible to see for 40+ km.

Built in 1947, the Gloucester Tree was one of eight karri trees that between 1937 and 1952 were made relatively easy to climb so that they could be used as fire lookout spots. The suitability of the tree as a fire lookout was tested by forester Jack Watson, who climbed the tree using climbing boots and a belt. It took Watson six hours to climb 58 metres, a difficult climb due to the 7.3-metre girth of the tree and the need to negotiate through limbs from 39.6 metres up. Jack Watson, a Gallipoli veteran, was also Superintendent of Kings Park in Perth. Another forester, George Reynolds, pegged the ladder and lopped branches to facilitate climbing the tree, and a wooden lookout cabin was built 58 metres above the ground.

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