Volume 56: Customer Projects

Thanks to this month’s contributors for submitting photos and details of there projects.

Yellow Cedar Chest

by David L Johnson

His photo also came with this lovely testimonial, thanks David!

Many months ago, you folks helped me in my search for some top-of-the-line yellow cedar for a carving project.  You found a log on North Vancouver Island. It was milled shipped to you, and you alerted me to its arrival. I came, selected some pristine timber and went away poorer but happy! The project was a wedding present for my son and now daughter-in-law. You asked if you could have a photo of the results, which delighted all concerned. Many thanks again to all of you for your fine service and knowledge.

IMG_1316

Guitar & Douglas-fir Bar

Patrick Poulin made the beautiful guitar, it was a hobby project and will be his first and last guitar. Come on Patrick! We know talent when we see it!

Kevin Morrin made the bar top and had this to say about his West Wind experience:

I found a great slab of fir in your loft this fall, and you help plane and cut the mitres. It all came together really well and I’m really happy with how the bar top ended up looking. Thanks for the extra time spend addressing some issues with the measurements. On the hunt for another project now!

Great Kevin, you know where to find us!

guitar by patrick poulin douglas-fir bar

We shared Eric Letham‘s completed project last issue, this month we get a peak at his latest work-in-progress.

eric letham

Our customer Matt Dolmage was busy over the holidays with creating more beautiful guitars and speakers.

Beautifully crafted chair by Steve Kristoffy. This chair can be available on special order. Contact Steve if your interested in having one of these made for yourself!

chair by steve (2)

Yellow Cedar Fishing Lures

by Wayne S. Boardman

Wayne makes these lures from 2×2 Alaskan Yellow Cedar. He was kind enough to share is technique and a few photos of the “rewards” received in the Cape Cod Canal.

I take 2X2 Alaska Yellow Cedar and turn it on a lathe down to a 6 inch Cape Cod Pencil. Through a drilled hole I insert a stainless welding wire, picking up a swivel half way through and a tail weight. Then comes a Spar varnish and BIN primer, after that comes airbrushing a pattern before epoxy and hooks.

Quite and art form! And they work too… just look at the spoils from a trip to the Cape Cod Canal in 2012, they caught 100lbs of fish but only kept 50lbs.

 

Jan’s Day Off: Raven Hood Deck Re-Dressed

We built in 1988 and moved into a home that was, at its best, considered 60% finished…at least in Shelley’s view.  Two out of three bedrooms were finished.  Kitchen had no upper cabinets; lower cabinets were just carcases with no shelving or doors.  Two out of three bathrooms were unfinished and for doors we hung old curtains.  Of course baseboards were nowhere on the horizon, but what we did have was a wonderful brand new 400 Sq.Ft. clear Yellow Cedar deck; specially built for my sister’s wedding in August 1989.  We were the hosts for this gala event!

***Note for any legally concerned readers.  We were authorized tenants with a proper occupancy permit well in place!

The Wedding Deck 1980's
The Wedding ~ The Deck ~ The 80’s
A little difficult to see because it’s so clearly yellow!
A little difficult to see because it’s so clearly yellow!

For twenty-six years it stood the demands of a typical family and multiple pets.  It was however plagued with problems due to corrosion of the fasteners causing rot.  The wood plugs let go, water seeped under and voila….water in a place that was not meant to be.

Finally in 2009, after investigating various repair ideas; even contemplating the replacement of the entire deck with ipe, I decided to deal with the original cedar.  Although the yellow cedar had a weathered patina, it was only 1/16” deep and the interior wood was pristine.

I decided to cut out all the ‘bad’ parts including the wood blocks underneath, and 250 pieces later, the deck was better than new!  This time I used stainless steel screws where needed and larger wood plugs inserted with our ecopoxy glue.  Good old-fashioned galvanized deck nails were used for the new wood blocks needed underneath where there were no supporting joists.

I opted to give a fresh coating of Ipe Oil and five-years later you can see “the good, the bad and the ugly” has weathered to a consistent beautiful grey.  No further refreshments needed!

The 2009 Fix:

All Grey Again in 2014

  aged yellow cedar deck  Aged yellow cedar deck

 

Joel’s Trip to Stanford University’s Bing Hall

What happens when you mix German beech , BC Yellow Cedar, Stanford university, a Russian woodworker (based in San Francisco) and West Wind Hardwood?  Last summer we manufactured 15,000 square feet of Beech and Yellow Cedar flooring.  The wood was destined for a concert hall on the Stanford campus in California.  This summer we had the opportunity to meet the contractor and see the installation first hand.

Alex Medvedev, owner of EH Floors Inc. was contracted to supply and install wood flooring inside the hall.  We met up at his office in San Francisco and from there headed south to see the project.

The Bing Concert Hall (where our wood was installed)  is a private performance space on the university campus in Palo Alto, California.  Steamed European beech was laid throughout the auditorium.   Alex mentioned most of the beech stair treads are unique shapes, which were fitted between two finished walls.  The wood stage is hallow like a drum (apparently for acoustics) and clad with 1 ¾” thick unfinished yellow cedar.  It was surprising to hear how loud and hollow footsteps sounded walking across it.  The semi-circular stage lifts are raised and lowered independently, from tiered (as seen in the pictures) to completely flat.

We are happy to have played a part in the construction of this unique building. Thanks Alex for taking the time from your schedule.  It was great to see all of your excellent work!

Reader’s Forum – Yellow Cedar Deck Chairs

If you live on Vancouver Island, you have a deck or patio and have some nasty chairs and tables. If you are a woodworker on Vancouver Island, winter is the time – the gardens are done and the fishing is waning.

Two winters ago, my dear friends asked me to build some deck chairs and a small table for their cabin. Their cabin is on a small island in the Gulf. I tried to entice them with the prospects of Ipe or Sapele, but their wishes were for something lighter, so anyone could lift the pieces and store them away. My friends had an article from a very old magazine that had a rough plan to work from. My good friends were both born and have lived on the Island all their lives. They like local.

So, off to West Wind Hardwood. Yellow Cedar was the choice: light and very strong, and durable for the ages. We bought some gorgeous large slabs of cedar.

I buy small amounts of quality wood from West Wind. I look for the wood of the highest quality and grain. To finish, my camera work sucks, the woodwork is great and the basic wood is the best.[simpleviewer gallery_id=”9″]

Written by Bill Howard
Trained in forestry (B.Sc.) and economics (M.A.) Specializing in BC woods, Douglas-fir and salvage.

The Yellow Cedar

A Communal Resident

It’s a given that my mission, when on holidays, is to take tree and/or wood-related pictures for our newsletter…and what an opportunity Strathcona Park gave us. This past September, found us on our annual tenting holiday; just before the park closed its gates for the winter. We came prepared, both mentally and physically, for full-day hikes of 5-6 hours; weather permitting. And thus we made a 6-hour round trip trek to Bedwell Lake; bringing us into the sub-alpine; home to the yellow cedar tree.

Although comfortable at lower elevations especially in the mid or north coastal regions, the yellow cedar is most common at higher elevations.
As we walk along, I’m constantly asking what tree is this or that. Of course, I never remember and why should I? I have my handy-dandy walking reference………..better than an IPAD or smart phone; don’t have to worry Wi-Fi hot-spots!

strathcona park map bc map

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