Danny’s Apprenticeship

A Journey into Journeymanship.

Do you know what a Joiner is? A Joiner will layout, machine, assemble, install and finish products that are fabricated from wood, plastics and other materials. Many of these processes will combine conventional techniques with automated (CNC/CAD/CAM) procedures.
As an example, joiners work in these areas:

  • Architectural Woodwork (Millwork)
  • Cabinets
  • Commercial furnishings
  • Residential furnishings
  • Yacht interiors
  • Specialty items

To become a certified journeyperson, you need to complete four years of apprenticeship training. Apprenticeship is a time-proven method of acquiring skills in the trade by combining technical in-school instruction with practical on-the-job training. Apprenticeship training is the best method for passing along trade skills from one generation to the next.
From the mouth of Danny:

“I’m looking forward to learning something new and spending time in the big city!”

Beyond acing his exams to date, Danny’s taken time to explore the Sloquet hot springs.  Here are his thoughts:

I wanted to go to a real hot spring, something in nature rather than pumped into a swimming pool!  I sure got what I wanted.  It took my around 4 hours to get there; 3 hours of that was on a rough road, and I mean really rough.   There was a lot of climbing with loose rock; so steep I had to use first gear, but still couldn’t go slow enough because it was so rocky.  Of course, the forester can handle it! I only scrapped the bottom a few times…lol…there were some deep washout as well. The drive was awesome, some nice views of Harrison lake and the mountains nearby

SarahTo temporarily replace Danny’s 6- week stay in Vancouver for his BCIT training, we welcome Sarah Von Drasek’s return.  Sarah will assist in our milling department.  Stop by and say ‘hello’ to an old friend..

Danny’s Summer Camping Trip – Tahsish River (Kyuquot Sound)

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Danny’s philosophy must be ‘a rolling stone gathers no moss’.

The Tahsish River in Kyuquot Sound is one of those wild places I’ve always dreamed of visiting. This  place is truly wild and untouched. Life goes on here as it has for thousands of years.  The Tahsish River estuary was the site of a historic first nations village; used only during the salmon season. We spent a week exploring Kyuquot Sound, Tahsish & Kwois Rvers by canoe; in my opinion, the best way of seeing the area. The canoe allowed us to get ridiculously close to all kinds of wildlife. In fact, you name it and we saw it; even the most elusive of creatures, the cougar! Having encountered one of the most seldom seen beasts of the continent face to face is an experience that will remain with me for life.

The park includes some amazing old growth forest, river and valleys, and lakes. Of course, we were blessed with the usual wet coast weather – rain, fog and a bit of sun!  Despite the rain we were kept busy picking berries and other wild edibles, all while keeping a close eye on our backs!  There was a bit of adjustment needed after coming back from this adventure… in realizing things aren’t as simple as they were on this trip.