VOL. 59 – Customer Projects

VOL. 59 – Customer Projects

The Scouts have finally finished the boats we started nearly two years ago and wanted to get these photos of the boys taking them out on Beaver Lake earlier this month.  It was a perfect evening to go out and the boys really enjoyed themselves.  The sense of pride in their faces knowing that they build something that actually floated was great to see.

I would like to thank you again on behalf of the 3rd Douglas Scout Group for your generous donation of material to make this project happen.

Thanks

Mike Dwyer

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Customer Projects Vol.58

layup

We have some talented customers! This is someone’s layup of there next project…


miracle-dry-rack

Poetic Justice – an innovative idea by Bruce Obee of North Saanich, BC

The dreaded miracle moulding has made a comeback as something useful—a drying rack for oiled fir.


Sailboat by Roy Morford after selling his Acorn 15 he built this next (with meranti ply from us). He’s starting to build a new sailboat, an Argie 15.

From Air to Water

In Memoriam

Water bomber in Thunder Bay Ontario -a

air-to-water-largeMy father (1919-2013) was born with salt water in his veins.  Boats were it for him.  And although not formally trained as a naval architect he was a self-taught boat designer and member of the Society of Small Craft Designers.  My childhood holds memories of him spending long evenings – night after night – hunched over his drafting table deep in the dungeon of our basement.

One of his customers was William (Bill) Smith – an airborne pilot and member of the BC Forest Service.  Bill had a dream and came to dad.  Together they came up with a design and a plan.  Unfortunately, he contracted Lou Gehrig’s Disease and as I was still ‘knee high to a grasshopper’ my details are sketchy.  I do however remember the hours both my Dad and Bill spent on this project.  Sadly Bill died far too young before achieving his dream.

I do not recall what happened to Bill’s family or the boat – which was never finished.  I do have a vague recollection of Margaret (Bill’s wife) finding a seller for the hull.  As I was sorting through my dad’s boxes and file cabinets (I’m talking income taxes from 1957; utility bills from the 80’s) I did come across this photo (below right) and felt it deserved sharing.

We all have dreams.  Certainly Jan has more than his fair share.  Long may they live.  And if we only see a quarter to closure, we are surely blessed.

Customer Projects Vol: 55

Herbert the Boat by Eric Letham

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Herbert is a Sam Devlin designed Candlefish 16 built out of Joubert marine mahogany using the stitch and glue method. Powered by a 20 horse outboard, it moves along nicely with two to three adults and a load of camping and fishing gear. The boat calls Shuswap Lake home, but has spent some time on the Pacific as well, chasing salmon and scenery.

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FOR SALE: One Dream Too Many – $500

set of nymph canoe plans and build materials

Material to Build Two “Nymph” Canoes – Sold as one Complete Package – Includes:

Drawings from Guillemont Kayaks – One Set (Value $90)         

Wood Strips (Value $600):
Sitka Spruce (55 strips) at 1/8” x ¾” x 12’ long
Western Red Cedar (54 strips) at 1/8” x ¾” x 12’ long
Sapele Mahogany (41 strips) at 1/8” x ½” x 12’ long

MDF Strips (Value $160)
¾” MDF – Cut in strips for mould station
6 pieces at 16” x 8’ long
14 pieces at 8” x 8’ long
14 pieces at 1” x 8’ long

If you have the dream, this could bring you closer to it. Contact us if you are interested!

The Dorothy Project

dorothy-early1900

“Not only is she beautiful as boats go with her fine lines, but she is also a fine sailing boat, fast for her size, gentle to handle, and extremely seaworthy. And she is a lucky boat, too, in that her owners have always, somehow, managed to maintain her, repair her, and restore her in such a way that she is now fully restored, still sailing, and still looking beautiful.”

– H.C. Charlesworth (Former Owner), Dorothy I, A Sailor’s Legacy.

Dorothy experienced 11 owners in her life before her donation to the Maritime Museum of B.C. in 1995.  Under the auspices of the MMBC, she sailed proudly until February 2003 when she was taken out of the water in February 2003 and put into storage.

For nine years she stayed dry-docked at the SALTS tallship society. Hard decisions had to be made about her care. The Museum was rapidly being drained of the legacy fund to storage fees, but a full restoration was extremely expensive and they were unlikely to find someone to do it for what they could afford. Dorothy waited.

tony-grove-removing-dorothy-floor-timbers

There was so much wrong with her – bad repairs, dissimilar metals that broke down the wood, mysterious rot around her keel – it was suggested to the Museum she might as well be burned or left to die. Shipwright Tony Grove heard this assessment of doom. And based on his thirty years of experience in building and restoring wooden boats, just couldn’t believe she was beyond repair and decided to take a look. The ‘Friends of Dorothy’ rallied.

Today, Dorothy has somehow survived to be Canada’s oldest functioning sailboat, and is about to be restored to glory – to race again in 2014!  And so, after 9 years in dry storage, Dorothy was trucked to Gabriola Island where the rest of Dorothy’s story will be written.

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How can you become part of a community that cares about our maritime history; enjoy bragging rights as valued contributor to the restoration of this 166 year old vessel; take pleasure in privileged access to behind-the-scenes footages, images, stories?

Contact Tobi Elliott @ dorothysails@gmail.comor call 604-832-7034.

Visit dorothysails.com to sign up for “Dorothy in the Grove”. This subscription service gives you behind-the-scenes access to the rebuilding of Dorothy; includes videos, how-to’s, audio podcasts and photos unique to Dorothy supporters.

Contact Tobi Elliott @ dorothysails@gmail.comor call 604-832-7034.

SUBMIT YOUR DOROTHY PHOTOS!  Archival photos of ‘Dorothy’ through the century; let us know if you can help out!

Contact Tobi Elliott @ dorothysails@gmail.com or call 604-832-7034.

Did you get the message yet?!  Give Toby a shout now!!

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Thanks to Tony, Tobi and the crew at Dorothy Sails for use of their images.

 

Tony Grove Woodworking School

grove-school

“When a person reaches that time in their life when they possess a rich storehouse of experience and skills in a particular sphere, I believe they are almost duty-bound to pass on that knowledge for the benefit of future generations.” – Tony Grove

Master shipbuilder Tony Grove (see Dorothy Sails article above) will be spreading his wealth of knowledge to other promising woodworkers and shipwrights in his new school on Gabriola Island.

Designed for novices as well as advanced, courses will focus on woodworking skills and techniques for the marine environment with a few non-marine programs mixed in. All skills learned will be transferable to general woodworking.

He is now accepting students and course suggestions for next summer. Visit the school’s website at thegroveschool.ca.


Thanks to Tony Grove for use of his photos.

A Little Body Sculpting to an Old Girl

by guest blogger Ian McMurdo

1962 gillnetter

A Fraser River Gillnetter built at Albion Boatworks in 1962.  Originally gas-powered, converted to Perkins diesel 6-354 in the mid 80’s along with other technological goodies of the time such as Wagner hydraulic steering and autopilot.  A friend (former boss of mine) bought her from a retired fisherman about 15 years ago with the idea that converting this boat for pleasure use would be his retirement project.  He had built a 22′ cold molded sport fisher in the past.  When I worked for him about 10 years ago we did some work on this boat and his sport-fisher at that time.  I had to quit to go back to university, but we remained friends and four years later when I graduated and moved back to Vancouver he offered me half the boat in exchange for helping him to “finish” the project.

gillnetter

Well… we worked on it together another 5 years and then he’d had enough (old body and other reasons…) but gave me the option to keep her and continue with a very favourable moorage arrangement in place that makes it all feasible.  He’s still involved in some capacity but not putting in the work days anymore.  For those 5 years we’d been chipping away at small things with the boat in the water 95% of the time and almost always remaining cruiseable in some capacity.  This past May 2013 I decided it was time to step up and address the much-needed hull work, so I had the boat hauled and moved to a site where I’ve got some good secure space for a reasonable price.  I outfitted a container as my shop and built the Stimson shelter you see in the pics (lifesaver)… so now I’ve got my own little boatyard which was a lot of work in itself.  I’ve committed to sacrificing almost all my free time until this is relaunched, which will hopefully be this summer.


Ian would appreciate any help with the vessel to make his target relaunch date. The vessel is located in North Vancouver and any interested wooden boat enthusiasts in the area willing to put in some work please email ianmcmurdo@gmail.com.